Six elements of coaching leaders

One is to create a safe, supportive but challenging environment.
We all need our thinking to be challenged at times. However, challenges can be damaging without adequate support by reducing trust and eroding morale. Providing safety and support involves reassuring people that they are being heard and understanding their feelings and values. It builds trust, encourages honesty and openness, and helps the people you coach feel psychologically safe in their work. It would be best to create an environment where risk-taking feels rewarding, not risky, so keep your attitude open and non-judgmental. Let your mentee know you support them even when testing their knowledge and skills. (This is the foundational framework of our Assessment-Challenge-Support (ACS)™; remember the ACS to ensure that you provide the support needed while providing accountability).

Six elements of coaching leaders

II Trying to work within the agenda of the person you are coaching.

This coaching session is not about you, so let the coachee decide which goals to work on or even how to make improvements. Of course, it is excellent when the coaching subject’s plan is perfectly aligned with the organization’s goals, but never impose your priorities on this relationship. Put on your management hat when it is apparent that you need to emphasize a particular point – thus maintaining the special collaborative coaching relationship you are trying to establish.

Six elements of coaching leaders

III Facilitate and collaborate.


Just as Socrates always guided his students with questions, the best coaches do not give direct answers or play the role of experts. When having a coaching conversation, focus on the coachee’s needs and avoid filling the session with your own life stories and pet theories. While you may suggest several ways to solve the problem, the coachee should decide the final choice – you play the role of facilitator and collaborator.

Six elements of coaching leaders

Fourth, promote self-awareness.

You want your mentee to learn to identify their strengths and weaknesses – a necessary skill for any good leader. Likewise, it would help if you understood how your behavior as a coach affects those around you. You are more likely to develop a similar self-awareness in the people you coach by demonstrating your awareness. You may also want to share ways to increase your self-awareness.

Six elements of coaching leaders

Fifth, promote learning from experience.


Most people can learn, grow and change only when they have the right experiences and are willing to learn from them. As a coach, always help your coaching clients reflect on past events and analyze what went well and what did not. By facilitating experiential learning and using experiences to develop, your students will continue to improve long after the session is over.

Six elements of coaching leaders

Six Coaching Models.

This is the last of the six core principles of coaching and probably the most difficult to embody because it means putting into practice outside the classroom the leadership lessons you have been trying to convey

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